9 Excellent Tips for Hiking in the Heat

Summer is probably the best time for hiking, but at the same time, you can often feel like it’s the worst possible time to go outside.

The clear skies and long, fresh daylight hours attract most hikers but these skies and long days can bake you in the heat. When the temperature rises, it gets tough to keep yourself motivated and calm.

You can still enjoy the beautiful outdoors in the same hot weather. You just need to take few precautions before heading out.

Don’t let the weather stop you from making some beautiful memories.

Here are few tips for hiking in hot weather that you should know before heading out.

1. Check Weather

Don’t just assume that you’d be fine on the trail. Hot weather comes with a lot of risks. It is important to check the weather forecast before planning a trip.

Humidity can be a sign of rainfall. Be prepared in advance.

Thunderstorms are also much more likely to occur when it’s hot. Keep yourself safe in all situations. So, check the weather before going out.

2. Start Early or Finish Late

Another good way to avoid heat is to start your trip early in the morning or in the late afternoon or evening. Skip the midday heat, don’t hike between 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hike during the coolest time of day. Be an Early Bird or a Night Owl.

3. Choose Your Trail Wisely

Hiking in a shady forest is different from on an uncovered mountain pass. So, it’s important to choose your trail wisely. Your trail should include shady sections where you can rest for few minutes.

Try to find a trail that runs along running water/river.

You can get drinking water easily
You’ll be able to refresh yourself and cool down.
A trail at a lower height is preferred if the weather is going to be hot because a higher trail offers a lower amount of oxygen and stronger UV rays.

4. Light Apparel

In hot weather hiking, try to wear synthetic clothes as you’ll definitely sweat a lot and moisture-wicking clothes can prevent irritation.

It is better that you wear long sleeve shirts, hiking pants, and fine quality boots. The more of your body you can shield from the sun, the happier you’ll be.

Your boots should be made up of breathable fabric so wet feet won’t represent a problem during your hike. Your clothes should be in loose-fitting as it will allow for better airflow, which keeps you cooler.

5. Keep Yourself Hydrated

Staying hydrated is the key to every successful outdoor adventure. This is particularly essential when you’re hiking in hot weather.

Your body loses about one liter of water per hour on a regular hike. A challenging outing in hot weather can double that amount. Make sure you replenish, otherwise you’ll get dehydrated during a hike in hot weather.

6. Eat Salty Snacks

A hot weather hike will result in copious sweating. As water is essential to restore your body fluid levels, it’s equally important to restock the electrolytes lost through sweat. The most important ones are potassium and sodium. They play a major role in managing your energy levels.

Make sure to bring plenty of snacks that have complex carbs. Don’t go for simple carbs like sugary drinks and candy. You can have energy bars or fruit as they are great sources of complex carbs.

7. Take Regular Breaks

Continuous hiking in hot weather is near to impossible. Your tired body needs few minutes to relax. Regular breaks also allow your body to cool down and sweat to evaporate.

Put your backpack down, lay down, and give your body some much-needed rest. Drink water and have some snacks to restock your energy that will keep you going for the next few hours.

You may also want to take off your hiking boots and airing your feet and sweaty socks.

8. Be Aware of Heat Stroke

Be aware of the symptoms of heat stroke. Listen to your body and it will tell you when you can push yourself and when it’s time to coast. Eat when you’re hungry, rest when you’re feeling tired.

Common signs of heat stroke

Throbbing headache
Dizziness
Muscle cramps
Nausea
Disorientation or confusion
Lack of sweating, despite hot temperatures
If you feel any of the above-mentioned symptoms, immediately find shade and try to cool down as soon as possible.

9. Protect Your Skin

In such a hot weather, it is important that you take care of your skin.

Sunburns can damage your skin
They also affect body’s ability to cool itself, thus increasing risks of dehydration.
Apply a sunscreen with an SPF 30+, 30 minutes before heading out. Put it underneath your clothes as well.
Wear a hat or head covering to ensure that your head and neck area does not get too hot. Apply plenty of sunscreen and UV-blocking sunglasses
“Better safe than sorry” is always a good motto to live by.

Always carry a cell phone and let others know where you will be hiking. In case you run into trouble for any reason you’ll be able to make a call for immediate help. So, don’t just sit back thinking how hot the weather will be. Plan, prepare well, and head out.

8 Things to See in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park is located in north-central Colorado. The size of the area is around 266,714 acres and consists of 60% forests, 18% bare rock and 13% alpine tundra. According to statistics, about 11% of the site is 11,000 feet high. Here is a description of 8 things you should see in Rocky Mountains.

1. Roads/Trails

You can explore the roads and rails on a vehicle or horseback, but if you are fit, you can also visit the sights on foot. Trail Ridge Road is a long stretch in the park and offers a spectacular view at a height of 12,183.

2. Peaks

The Rocky Mountain has over 100 peaks at a height of over 11,000 feet. Moreover, in the North, you can see snow-covered Never Summer Mountains in addition to 17 other peaks. Aside from this, Longs Peak is 14,259 feet high and is one of the most favorite destinations for hikers and climbers.

3. Glaciers

While the glaciers are retreating because of the global warming and other temperature changes, you can still find the sky-high glaciers over there, such as Sprague, Moomaw, Mills and Andrews, just to name a few.

4. Alpine Visitor Center

At a height of 11,796 feet, you can see the Alpine Visitor Center, which runs along the popular Trail Ridge Road. This is one of the top rest stop in the Rocky Mountains.

5. Water Sites

In the Rocky Mountains, you can find a lot of waterfalls, rivers, lakes and streams. They are ideal for photography, rafting, kayaking, fishing and sightseeing. Once there, you can choose Bear Lake Road, The Lock Sky Pond or Glass Lake, for instance.

6. Plants

The many environmental zones of the park offer a host of flora and fauna. For instance, the park offers meadows with tall grass and amazing wildflowers, dense forests, wetlands and Roosevelt National Forest. On the other hand, the high zones offer subalpine fir trees, shrubs and wildflowers. These plants will steal your heart and you won’t want to come back home.

7. Animals

The fauna section of the Rocky Mountains include larks, sparrows, ravens, finches, falcons, eagles, mule deer, elk, sheep, bighorn, black bears, coyotes, lions and so on. Aside from this, if you are at higher elevations, you can find beautiful pikas, marmots, rabbits, deer mice, ermine, bobcats and red foxes.

Besides, the park is home to some endangered species, such as cutthroat trout, yellow-billed cuckoo and the Canada lynx. In addition, you can find over 140 species of butterflies and tons of species of other insects.

8. People

Every year, over 3 million individuals from different corners of the world head for the Rocky Mountain National Park. Visiting the RMNP will be a multi-cultural experience for you. You can talk to other park visitors in order to find out about their languages and cultures.

So, if you are getting bored, we suggest that you choose the Rocky Mountain as your next tour destination. We bet this destination will take all your boredom away from you.

Is Rocky Mountains your next travel destination? If so, we hope that the information given in this article will make your trip more enjoyable.

The Best Backpacking Europe Routes

An adventurous backpacking trip to Europe can be the international trip of a lifetime and one to add to your bucket list. I was on the fence when the idea was presented to me, but it didn’t take long to change my mind. I was promised by some experienced travelers that backpacking is the only way to go especially if you’re looking for gorgeous nature, a cultural melting pot, world famous sites and a whole world of adventure. There are few time restraints when you backpack and unparalleled when compared to other ways to travel. There is no right or wrong way to enjoy hiking in Europe, but here is a sample of our route that worked for us.

1. London
Our first stop was Heathrow Airport because it is connected to the public transportation that will safely get you to some very famous landmarks. Our first stop was Buckingham Palace and it was even better in person than any picture or video can relay. The home of the Royal family is as incredible on the outside as it is on the inside. We missed the iconic changing of the guards but I hear it’s spectacular. Make sure you add it to your “while in London list” as well as the Tower of London, St. Paul’s Cathedral and Westminster Abbey. They, too have historical significance and are must-sees during your hike throughout the city.

2. Paris
Trust me on this. Paris, known as the City Of Love is awesome. Take the Eurostar, underground train from London to Paris. Just the thought of traveling underneath the English Channel is unbelievable. There is so, so much to experience here. How about the one and only Eiffel Tower. My wife and I enjoyed a leisurely picnic lunch (French staples cheese, wine, and bread) from the outside, but my travel partners paid for a ticket to get a bird’s eye view from the top. Either way, get a photo or two because seeing this iconic tower in person was to say the least, surreal. We could’ve stayed on the grass forever but when they came down from the top, we were off again to see the Notre Dame Cathedral and the Montemartre art district that features the Sacre Coeur Basilica. The architecture alone is amazing. Whether you appreciate art or not, these landmarks will impress you.

3. Rome
This is a truly the best place to backpack. It is full of ancient history and cultural sights that look just like postcard photos, only better. I have read about so many of the places this eternal city offers and the fact that we were personally experiencing it is was truly captivating. It takes a while to get there, but it’s well worth the train ride. Remember Rome wasn’t built in a day, so take your time and spend some extra time here, if your schedule allows. One of the must-sees (actually they are all must-sees) is the Colosseum. Walk around, experience the historical architecture and go back in time when the Romans sat and watched gladiators fight in that same arena. Then I recommend visiting the Pantheon, The Vatican, to say a prayer and take in Michelangelo’s masterpiece in the Sistine Chapel. If time permits go over to the Trevi Fountain and toss a few coins in for good luck. Tradition has it that one coin is for love and the other is to guarantee you will return to Rome again. I wish I had time to discuss the many different restaurants. Our policy was to eat where the locals do and live by the age-old rule, “When in Rome” do as the Romans do. We didn’t have one bad meal.

4. Cinque Terre
Cinque Terre translates into five tiny towns on the western Italian coast that look like a colorful boutique of buildings. The villages are Monterosso, Riomaggiore, Vernazza, Corniglia and Manarola and each one is an individual marvel. I can’t speak a word of Italian but it didn’t matter. My senses were able to drink in all of the culture and personality offered here. We were amazed by one of kind natural cliffs in their National Park that conveniently surround all five towns. It has to be one of Mother Nature’s best creations. It is perfect for backpackers who don’t always like to be in big city crowds. We boarded a train with a day pass that allowed us to ride between these picturesque towns as many times as we wanted. You need to purchase a pass to walk around too. Staying overnight will probably be a good idea. There is a variety of overnight accommodations that offer a comfortable and affordable good night’s rest. Cinque Terre is a place I will return to perhaps without my backpack the next time and stay a little longer.

5. Berlin
Germany is fascinating and never fails to impress me. The sightseeing opportunities and landmarks are full of history, architecture marvels and even castles. This European country is like no other and the scenery is almost like walking back in time through an eclectic collection of modern buildings. For example, the famous Brandenburg Gate landmark, once a symbol of country’s division is not considered just the opposite, unification. The dark granite pillars create a walking tour maze and is the perfect spot for photos. The most disturbing, but emotional place we visited was the underground museum that showcases the plight of the Jews when the Nazi’s had control. Talk about a challenging time. But Berlin has a much lighter, modern side too. There are some hip neighborhoods to explore, really cool locals to meet and delicious food to taste. I ordered the vegan cuisine with Vietnamese noodles that was delicious. Then we took a walk on a closed airport runway that is now open to the public. There is so much to do and see, but the common denominator of Berlin is that no matter where you go, whether you backpack or not, the sky is the limit for awesome sights, sounds, tastes and experiences.

There is never enough time to explore everything Europe in one visit, so don’t expect to. But I recommend planning where you want to go and leaving enough room for some unexpected stops along the way. Europe is one of the most interesting continents in the world, and especially interesting when you take along your best friends and a backpack.